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Bridge, 22″ x 28″” , 1993

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August Moon Rising, 17″ x 22 1/2″ , 2016

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Big Sky, 17″ x 22 1/2″ , 2016

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High Mesa, 17″ x 22 1/2″ , 2015

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Charles Burchfield, 1893 – 1967

Celebrated American watercolour painter Charles Burchfield was a natural reference for me. He has had more influence on my work than any other painter that I esteem. His visionary landscape paintings contain wonderfully evocative and poetic depictions of the natural environment in its many moods and manifestations – from insects to wildflowers, to shimmering trees, to the heavily laden approach of a high summer thunderstorm. I find his work to be richly redolent with  sense impressions and aesthetic inventions. Burchfield’s highly tuned sensitivity and creative imagination fostered a deep alignment with the ever changing dynamics of nature. From about 1943 to 1967 he began to make use of some of the pictorial inventions that he discovered in his early twenties. These devices consisted of notations for sound, vibrations, presence, and atmosphere that could be incorporated into his work. It was due to a continually evolving process within the depths of his creativity that some of his most rhapsodic experiences  were rendered visible in his paintings during this period. “God’s greatest gift to me is the ability to be astonished anew each year by the almost incredible beauty of a dandelion plant in full bloom.” (Burchfield). A familiar William Blake quote seems appropriate here: “To see the world in a grain of sand                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            And heaven in a wildflower                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Hold infinity in the palm of your hand          ...

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Postcards from the Psyche: Images from an Interior Source

I like to think of my work as Postcards from the Psyche (Soul) as it has become increasingly apparent to me after many years of enquiry, that the impulse for its production arises from a spontaneous, subtle, interior, visionary source. This is the place where creative currents run deep and provide a fertile setting from which golden imaginal fishes (of invention, of innovation, of clarity, of origination) rise from hidden domains in response to our proper approach, and offer a boon to our meditations. The same place where: “… the secretly perceived is made visible.” (Klee). The stimuli that sets the creative process in motion for me has many aspects including: Meditations, ideas, feelings, memories, sensations, reflections, intuitions, dreams, sojourns in Ontario’s natural environment, photos, sketches – the accumulation of life experiences. They ultimately form a workable synthesis. This fusion presents itself to my ‘inner eye’ as an engaging image that offers a challenge to its capture in a painting. My usual procedure is to begin with a thumbnail sketch that becomes developed in a full sized plan in which the composition and design relationships become established in outline on tracing paper in accordance with my subjective decisions. The completed plan is then transferred to the watercolour paper and the painting adventure begins. In that I am not attempting to render a likeness of some aspect of the external objective world in front of me, my approach to the painting is usually a tentative one. Working from an internal image, the translation of that vision into a tangible form is not always clearly defined. I am required to follow the development of the work as it leads me. It becomes a series of decisions, discoveries, and adjustments that continue until the matter looks to be finished. I do not work from a formula and because of that each engagement in image making strikes me as unique. The development of the work is usually a matter of trying to find the proper solutions to painterly problems as they...

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